20 June, 2003

ZZZZap

Paramount's Kings Island amusement park is being sued because a man was hit by lightning while in the parking lot.

But they should hold the park accountable, for not telling his client and thousands of others about an impending lightning storm, Edner said Monday. "They could have told the people not to go to their cars, which are large metal objects that can attract lightning."

And all have big insulating tires attached to them, which generally negate the threat of a lightning strike. I mean, I could be wrong here, I'm no physics whiz. But if there was that much danger from the "large metal objects", wouldn't we all get out of our cars when an electrical storm hits while we're driving down the interstate?

Even if park officials weren't aware of the impending storm, Ebner insisted, they should have been and taken steps to protect patrons. The suit accuses the park of negligence by not warning park-goers.

"The park didn't know about the impending danger, yet they should have warned patrons anyways." Does anybody else see the faulty logic in that?

My main problem with this case is the idea that the patrons weren't warned. Now, this is just my experience, but whenever an electrical storm has come my way, I've known about it for quite some time. First, the sky gets dark and cloudy. Then, it gets darker! Finally, I start seeing flashes of lightning, many miles away. And by using a complicated measuring system *, I can tell approximately how far away the storm (and hence, the lightning) is. If the storm is really fucking close, I get myself away from things that might be struck by lightning.

So what it boils down to is:

  • There was an electrical storm approaching the amusement park.
  • This storm was forecast by the weather service, who most likely sent out warnings.
  • Kings Island, which did not receive the warnings, failed to warn the patrons of the impending storm.
  • This magical storm had no outward, physical manifestation, outside of the bolt of lightning that hit the parking lot at the amusement park.

Oh yeah. Back. And to the left.
Back.
And to the left.

1 comment:

  1. But they should hold the park accountable, for not telling his client and thousands of others about an impending lightning storm, Edner said Monday. "They could have told the people not to go to their cars, which are large metal objects that can attract lightning." I can see it now: "Do not, repeat, do not go to your cars, which are large metal objects that can attract lightning. Stay inside the park near the giant roller coasters."

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